Contact: Ryan Hardy; Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP (Missouri, USA)

In each of Parts 1, 2, and 3 of this series on implied warranties, we urged you to disclaim your implied warranties, and promised that we would soon tell you how. In this post, we make good on that promise.

Read more: Manufacturer's Corner: Implied Warranties, Part 4


Contact: Ryan Hardy; Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP (Missouri, USA)

We break from our ongoing series on implied warranties to notify you of a recent opinion by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. We will resume our regular series shortly.

In 2010, Congress tasked the SEC with imposing disclosure requirements on reporting company manufacturers[1] if so-called “conflict minerals”[2] are “necessary to the functionality or production of [their] product[s].”

Read more: Manufacturer's Corner: SEC's Final Rule on Conflict Minerals Partially Stricken by D.C. Circuit


Contact: Ryan Hardy; Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP (Missouri, USA)

Data breaches have been big news lately. Hot on the heels of revelations by major retailers that hackers were able to obtain personal information about their customers, a vulnerability in Open SSL was made public on April 7. The vulnerability, known colloquially as Heartbleed,[1] allowed easy access to sensitive information held by a host of major companies, including customer passwords. The Washington Post has a useful primer on the bug.

Read more: The Heartbleed Paradox


Contact: Ryan Hardy; Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP (Missouri, USA)

After a brief detour, we now resume our series on implied warranties. So far, we have discussed the implied warranty of merchantability and the unenumerated implied warranties that may be imposed by course of dealing or usage of trade. We now turn to the implied warranty of fitness for a particular purpose. This is an important one, because it examines not only how your product should perform as a general matter, but how the product should perform with respect to specific customers.

Read more: Manufacturer's Corner: Implied Warranties, Part 3


Contact: Antony Morris; Clarkslegal LLP (Reading, England)

For many years the rules governing civil claims have provided that money claims (except personal injury claims) can be started in either the High Court or the County Court, but that claims could be issued in the High Court only if they are greater than £25,000.

Read more: High Court or County Court?