Firm Administrators




Meet the Co-chairs - TAGLAW


Lyon, Bruce C.
Reid and Riege, P.C.
blyon@reidandriege.com


Wilson, Jacki
Carter Newell
jwilson@carternewell.com



Carter Newell Lawyers returns a piece of Rock n Roll history to the Bee Gees 50 years on

Carter Newell Lawyers, TAGLaw's member firm in Brisbane Australia, has returned to beegeescolor_lr.jpgBarry Gibb, oldest brother of the Bee Gees trio, the original promotional recording contract entered into by the Gibb brothers, Barry, Robin and Maurice 50 years ago on 16 March 1959.

Carter Newell’s Practice Development Manager, Jacki Wilson states the document was located during an audit of the firm’s safe custody documents as part of the firm’s quality assurance systems. Upon location of the document and consideration of the ownership title, the firm embarked on a project to return the document to the Gibb brothers.

Tracking down the original promoters, Bill Goode, William Gates and the executor of the estate of John Proctor was no easy task and ...

Read more: The BEE GEEs Contract Returned


The Long Term Impact of Incorporation
on the Australian Legal Industry
A Structural Analysis
By Dr Peter Ellender, CEO Carter Newell Lawyers


Legislation across Australia to enable legal partnerships to incorporate has been a long time coming but is on the near horizon with NSW and Victoria active for a few years and now Queensland with its state legislation in place from 1 July 2007 under the Legal Profession Act 2007 with other states following.

The implications for the structure of the industry are far and wide.  Much attention has been focussed on the operation of multidisciplinary practices and of late the option for firms to float but the impact is much wider than that.  Incorporation may well change the competitive structure of the industry over the next 5-10 years.

Critical to the whole change is the fundamental difference that legal service providers will have the ability to share profits with others and therefore will have access to capital.  Lawyers will no longer be constrained (or protected) by the partnership model where all funding has to be provided by the partners and all profits have to be distributed fully to them, leaving no retained earnings in the business nor the ability to share profits with other parties.
[The complete six page article can be downloaded by clicking on The Long Term Impact of Incorporation.pdf (68.09 KB).]


Read more: Long Term Impact of Incorporation