Immigration Law




Meet the Co-chairs - TAGLAW


Paget, Joel H.
Ryan, Swanson & Cleveland, PLLC
paget@ryanlaw.com


Immigration Law


Biometric Residence Permits (BRPs) are biometric immigration documents that are issued to all non-EEA nationals who have been granted permission to stay in the UK for more than 6 months. UK Employers and their HR staff must familiarise themselves with these documents as they will only have a statutory excuse if they have carried out the right to work checks correctly.

Read more: What UK Employers need to know about Biometric Residence Permits


New year – new rules. The UK’s immigration rules constantly change and our immigration team continues to work closely with their business clients to ensure they continue to comply with the UK’s immigration rules.

Here, we discuss changes involving the Immigration Health Surcharge, Overseas Criminal Record Checks and document retention – changes which are expected to take place in April this year. 

To read the full article please click here


Proactive immigration policy is set to be used as a driver for economic diversity and to attract innovation to New Zealand. Over the next four years up to 400 Global Impact Visas will be on offer to young and talented technology entrepreneurs in an attempt to make New Zealand the Silicon Valley of the South Pacific. The incentive, while similar to programmes in Australia and Singapore, sets itself apart by actively seeking out candidates who want to make a global impact.

Read more: New Zealand Immigration update: Global Impact Visas


Beginning November 5, 2015, U.S. Consulates were instructed by the Visa Office to send notices to visa holders informing them that their visas had been revoked due to a report that they had been arrested for driving while under the influence within the last five years, unless the arrest was addressed within the context of a visa application.

Read more: Revocation of Visa Based on DUI Arrest


Contact: Liz Timmins; Clarkslegal (Reading, England)

UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) have recently made changes to the Tier 2 and 5 sponsor guidance published on its website. UKVI already imposes onerous obligations on employers who sponsor employees who are from outside of the European Economic Area (EEA) on Tier 2 visas. The changes, which mostly take effect from 19 November 2015, introduced more onerous reporting and record-keeping obligations and tougher sanctions for employers who don’t meet these to UKVI’s satisfaction:

Read more: More onerous duties imposed on employers who sponsor employees on Tier 2 visas