In the recent case of A Limited FURBS [2017] 21/2017, the Guernsey Court held that, in the exceptional circumstances arising, it was appropriate for the trustees to submit to the jurisdiction of the English Court in divorce proceedings involving one of the trust’s beneficiaries.

The case, detailed further below, will provide useful guidance for Isle of Man trustees affected by foreign proceedings.

Similar to the position in Guernsey, the Isle of Man’s trust legislation includes firewall provisions, the purpose of which is to exclude the recognition or enforcement of foreign court orders or judgments that are inconsistent with Isle of Man trust law or the terms of an Isle of Man trust unless the Isle of Man High Court orders that such orders or judgments are to be recognised.

Read more: Guidance for Trustees - when should you submit to the jurisdiction of a foreign court?


In June 2016[1]. The Apex Court confirmed that abuse of Sections 54 and 167 of the Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC) 1898, dealing with arrest on suspicion and subsequent remand, were inconsistent with the fundamental rights guaranteed by the Constitution. The Appellate Court confirmed the directions issued by the High Court in 2004 and declared that in the full judgment it will issue specific guidelines for the Police for exercising its powers under S. 54 and 167 of the CrPC.

Read more: Policing the Police - A Judicial Intervention in Bangladesh


By: Tracy S. Smith

It has been about a month since the Pokémon Go App was launched and it has become hard to ignore the popularity of the game (even if you want to). Groups of players, also known as “trainers”, can be found lingering around in public, quasi-public, and private areas in an effort to catch Pokémon, battle at a “gym”, or reap rewards at a local Pokéstop.

Read more: What to Know if Chasing a Pokémon… or if you Want to Catch a Pokémon-Chaser in Your Yard


Contact: Cole R. Southall and Anthony R. Foderaro; Fillmore Riley LLP (Manitoba, Canada)

Technology has revolutionized how we work, communicate and socialize, but it has also given predators and bullies an additional platform to torment their victims. Legislators and the courts have been scrambling to catch up with ever-advancing technology to address “revenge porn” and “cyberbullying." The following is a brief overview of how the Legislatures and the courts have considered these issues, in both the civil and criminal context.

Read more: Revenge porn, cyberbullying and the law


Contact: Cynthia Fischer and Daniel Pereira

Recent changes to the federal statute governing warranties on consumer products will make it easier and more cost-effective for consumer product manufacturers and suppliers to satisfy the federally-mandated warranty notification requirements. On September 24, 2015, President Obama signed into law the E-Warranty Act of 2015. The E-Warranty Act amends the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975, (the MMWA) modernizing the warranty notification requirements. It allows manufacturers and suppliers of retail products to publish the terms and conditions of consumer product warranties online rather than including the terms and conditions with the products themselves. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) must issue rules no later than September 24, 2016 to reflect the terms of the E-Warranty Act.

Please click here to read the full Alert.